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Solar Eclipse April 2014

Annular Solar Eclipse 29 April 2014 – Saros Series 148 - member number 21 of 75

Everything you ever wanted to know about the Eclipse of the Sun April 2014 

Solar Eclipse Information, fast details, in depth details, maps, diagrams, for April 2014 Annular Eclipse

 

 

 

 

Fast Facts: Annular Solar Eclipse 29 April 2014

Times, Magnitudes, duration, location, April Eclipse 2014

 

Eclipse Type: a rare non-central annular.

Maximum Eclipse and obscurity: Antarctica

 

Penumbra first contact:   03:52:38.2 UT/GMT

Umbra first contact:        05:57:49.6 UT/GMT

Greatest Eclipse Time:   07:45:39.8 UT/GMT

 

Maximum Annular Duration: Approximately 49.3 seconds

Maximum Obscurity approximately 97.3%.

 

Umbra last contact:        06:09:20.1 UT/GMT

Penumbra last contact:   08:14:27.7 UT/GMT

 

Penumbral Magnitude:    2.3183

Umbral Magnitude:         1.2907

Saros Series 148; member number 21 of 75

1st Annular Solar Eclipse of Saros Series 148

Annular Solar Eclipse 29 April 2014 – Saros Series 148 - member number 21 of 75

Detailed Information April 2014 Solar Eclipse

 

The first solar eclipse of the year occurs on 29 April 2014

The first solar eclipse of the year occurs on 29 April 2014. It is an Annular Solar Eclipse and is member number 21 of 75 from Saros Series 148, and is the first annular eclipse of the series. The last time an eclipse from Saros Series 148 appeared was 18 years 11 days 8 hours ago on 17 April 1996. That solar eclipse was a penumbral. Consequently as this is the first annular eclipse of the series, the path from which it can be observed is extremely limited, both location wise and the length of the annular path.

 

Maximum eclipse is confined to a very remote and very small area of Antarctica

Maximum eclipse is confined to a very remote and very small area of Antarctica with an annular duration of approximately 49.3 seconds producing a small D-shape shadow on Earth’s surface at Antarctica. The Sun will be skimming the horizon; Maximum obscurity approximately 97.3% | Magnitude 0.9868. Two remote research stations in Antarctica are within the boundaries of the eclipse.

 

Within limits of Eclipse

Two Antarctica Reasearch Stations - French and Italian Operated Research Station Concordia, Dome C, and French operated Dumont d’Uville

 

The Franco-Italian Research Station named Concordia, Dome C, at coordinates 75°06’s. 123° 20’e  is on the border of the southern limit of the eclipse and from here the beginning of the eclipse is visible but the Sun is too low to observe maximum eclipse. The other research station is the French operated Dumont d’Uville at coordinates 66 n° 39’ 46’’s | 140° 00’ 05’’e near the Southern Ocean from where the beginning of the eclipse is visible, but the eclipse ends just before or at maximum obscurity. The Dumont d’Uville Research Station is close to the centre of the tear-drop shape area of the eclipse.    

 

As with all annular eclipse the Moon is slightly too far away from Earth and therefore appears just a tiny bit too small to produce a Total Solar Eclipse. Therefore during the annular phase, the Sun will shine a fiery ring around the Moon and be far too bright to look at without eye protection. It is likely that no one will be at the precise location in Antarctic to observe the annular phase of the eclipse, but there are regions where it appears as a partial eclipse, and if observing the event you must wear eye protection or use filters on your telescope. To some areas north of maximum obscuration the eclipse is partial, but again occurs across remote regions of both the Southern Ocean and Indian Ocean.

 

A Rare Eclipse

The annular eclipse of April 2014 is rare and is classified as a non-central annular eclipse. The geometry of the eclipse is interesting, but It’s rarity is mainly of scientific value; the central-axis of the Moon’s anti-umbral shadow cast out into Space actually misses Earth completely, and it is only the shadow edge which skims the surface of Earth.  According to ‘Espenak and Meeus, 2006’ only (1.7%) 69 eclipses out of 3,956 annular eclipses occurring over 5,000 years from -2000 to +3000 have been non-central.

 

 

The only significant populated land mass from which the eclipse can be observed is Australia

Within Australia most regions, can observe varying degrees of a Partial Solar Eclipse

 

Fast fact information Eclipse of the Sun 29 April 2014 

Visibility

 

Antarctica: Region of annular eclipse extremely limited and location is remote. Annular eclipse only observable from Antarctica where a small D-shape shadow is cast on the surface of Earth.  

 

A Partial Eclipse visible from some regions of: Antarctica, Southern Ocean, Indian Ocean, Australia.

 

Australia is the only major populated major land mass from which the eclipse is visible. Observable from most parts of Australia in varying degrees as a partial solar eclipse, but is not observable from parts of Eastern Australia, especially on coastal regions, nor from Queensland's Cape York on the Cape York Peninsula which is outside all physical limits of the eclipse.

 

Maximum Visibility is from Tasmania, Australia, capital Hobart maximum obscurity of 64.39% (more than any other Australian major conurbation).

 

Australia Local Eclipse Conditions April 2014 towns and cities viewing circumstances.

World Map - Annular Solar Eclipse 29 April 2014

Saros Series 148 - member number 21 of 75  

The first solar eclipse of 2014

The World map of the Annular Solar Eclipse 29 April 2014 shows what can be observed from various locations across Earth.

 

World Map Solar Eclipse Key                                                          Click map to enlarge

 

Grey region:       Annular eclipse region. (Antarctica). Only region from which the annular phase of the eclipse can be observed.Maximum obscurity 97.3%.  

White region:     Partial Eclipse. The complete duration of a partail eclipse can be observed. Beginning; Maximum: and end of eclipse.  

 

Orange region 1:   Eclipse at sunrise: Beginning and maximum eclipse occurs while sun is below horizon. Partial eclipse ends as Sun rises.

Yellow region  1:   Eclipse at sunrise. Maximum eclipse already occurring as sun rises. Then partial eclipse ends as Sun rises higher above the horizon.

 

Yellow region  2:   Eclipse at sunset.  Beginning and maximum eclipse visible. Sun sets before eclipse has ended.  

Orange region 2:   Eclipse at sunset:  Beginning of eclipse occurs as sun is setting. Both maximum and end of eclipse occur with Sun below horizon.

Partial Eclipse of varying obscurity is visible from most parts of Australia

 

The only significant populated land mass from which the April eclipse 2014 can be observed is Australia

 

Solar Eclipse Observability - Australian town and cites: Maximum partial eclipse in Australia occurs on the southern coastal region of Tasmania, and further inland; Hobart has obscurity of approximately 64.39%, more than any other Australian city or town. From Hobart, at maximum eclipse obscuration. the Sun will be close to the horizon, so you need an unobstructed horizon to view the event. From Hobart the Sun will set before the eclipse has ended.

 

From Western Australia, Northern Territory, two thirds of South Australia, and parts of western Queensland the complete partial eclipse can be observed;

Perth obscurity 49.17%; Darwin 3.61% obscurity, and Alice Springs 26.8% obscurity.

 

The beginning and maximum eclipse can be observed from: Adelaide 51.22% obscurity; Cairns 5.88% obscurity; Canberra 46.22% obscurity; and Melbourne 54.59% obscurity, but the Sun sets before the eclipse has ended.

 

The extreme north of Queensland at Cape York on the Cape York Peninsula is outside all physical limits of the eclipse.

 

Annular Solar Eclipse 29 April 2014

World Map of annular solar eclipse April 2014

click map to enlarge and see detail.

Click map of Australia to enlarge

 

Australia Solar Eclipse April 2014 - Map Key

 

Partial Eclipse area: Complete duration of partial eclipse visible. Beginning: Maximum: and End visible.                              

Area 1: Eclipse at sunset. Beginning of eclipse and maximum eclipse visible: Sun sets before eclipse has finished.  

Area 2: Eclipse at sunset. Sun sets as eclipse begins. Maximum eclipse - Not Visible -  occurs below the horizon.  

Mark X: Designates penumbra last contact with Earth: 08:14:27.7 UT/GMT          

 

The closer an observer is to a different region, you will see slightly more or slightly less of the eclipse, depending on what region you are next to.

 

29 April 2014 - List of Eclipse Towns and Cities Local Viewing Conditions

antarctica_Small Australia_medium_map_April_2014_Solar_Eclipse_Geeks

Eclipse Geeks using program Occult 4.0.9.40

 

Time of Greatest Eclipse

 

Antarctica Greatest Eclipse:  06:3:24 UT

 

Path Width = 0.0 km

 

Eclipse Coordinates

Longitude: 131.3° E      Sun’s Azimuth:    318.8°

Latitude:      70.6° S      Sun’s Altitude:     0.0°        

 

 

Saros Series 148; member number 21 of 75

1st Annular Solar Eclipse of Saros Series 148

small_world_map_April_2014_Solar_Eclipse_Geeks

 

Eclipse Type: a rare non-central annular.

Maximum Eclipse and obscurity: Antarctica.

Eclipse Type: a rare non-central annular.

 

Penumbra first contact:   03:52:38.2 UT/GMT

Umbra first contact:         05:57:49.6 UT/GMT

Greatest Eclipse Time:    07:45:39.8 UT/GMT

 

Maximum Annular Duration: Approximately 49.3 seconds

Central Duration = 00m00s

 

Maximum Obscurity approximately 97.3%.

 

Umbra last contact:        06:09:20.1 UT/GMT

Penumbra last contact:   08:14:27.7 UT/GMT