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Photos Penumbral Lunar Eclipse 28 November 2012

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Eclipsegeeks reproduced this image by kind permission of astronomer Raven Yu; image credit, Raven Yu:

Here is a link to: Raven Yu's astronomy blog.

click image to enlarge

 

See photos of the Total Solar Eclipse

13/14 November 2012.

 

Photos Total Solar Eclipse 13/14 Nov 2012

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse Photos - last eclipse of 2012

 

The eclipse was a deep penumbral eclipse but its effect on the Moon was only very faint shading to the Moon's northern hemisphere.

The Moon passed through Earth's Penumbra with the northern limb of the Moon close to Earth's umbra shadow, while the southern tip of the Moon passed just outside the penumbra shadow of Earth; therefore the extreme south of the Moon did not pass through any shadow of Earth.

 

The Moon was slightly darker in its northern region and gradually lightened in shade in its southern hemisphere.

 

For observers in the southern hemisphere the north of the moon actually is reversed and points downwards, therefore during the eclipse of the Moon, the darker shading was reversed and appeared on the Moon's lower limb.  As observed from Philippines

 

image credit Carlo Garcia. [some rights reserved. This image you are free to share, copy, distribute and transmit this work subject to conditions of the Creative Commons Public Licence.]

 

Click image of Penumbral Lunar Eclipse to enlarge.

 

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse Photograph Description

This image of a Penumbral Lunar Eclipse shows the Moon before the eclipse occurred, then at 33 minutes into the penumbra stage, and then the moon at maximum eclipse. As can be observed, even though there are side-by-side comparisons to be made, the changes are subtle and extremely small, and when viewing a penumbral lunar eclipse live, it is almost unnoticeable.  

 

Quezon City, Philippines

 

This wonderful photograph of the penumbral lunar eclipse as observed from Quezon City, Philippines, 28 November 2012 was photographed by Raven Yu.

 

The image shows two comparison images, one taken after the event and the other during maximum eclipse.

 

The subtle darker shading of the eclipsed Moon would be extremely challenging and maybe indictable to normal human eye acuity by just looking at the Moon without comparing it to anything, but this comparison shows the subtle change of darkening to the Moons (which appears to be its south west region) but is in fact its northern hemisphere.

 

The Moon when observed from the southern hemisphere of Earth appears upside down, with its north pointing south; and the amount pointing downwards depends on the amount of southern latitude from which an observer views the Moon.

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse, Quezon City, Philippines

28 November 2012, shows two comparison images, one taken after the event and the other during maximum eclipse.

 

The brilliant photograph above of the  below was taken by Raven Yu, she said that they were lucky because the skies were very clear over Quezon City, Philippines. However, even though the skies were clear, Raven is modest because it takes great skill to take such an impressive photograph.  

 

The Moon when observed from the southern hemisphere of Earth appears upside down, as compared to when observed from the northern hemisphere.

The Moon's north polar region is at or near the bottom, and increases pointing downwards depending on the amount of southern latitude from which an observer views the Moon.

 

Faint Shading to the Moon at Maximum Eclipse 

One can detect a a faint shading to the Moon at maximum eclipse to the lower left region of the Moon (which is actually the north region of the Moon). The shading is faint and without this side by side comparison of a penumbral eclipsed Moon and a normal Full Moon, the difference is unlikely to be that noticeable to the human eye.

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You may be interest to read about a similar prenumbral lunar eclipse on the 11th November 2017.

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse, February 2017 Penumbral Lunar Eclipse, 28th February 2012