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Penumbral Lunar Eclipse 2012 - 28 November 2012

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse World Map - 28 November 2012

Map-img-World-Diagram-Penumbral-Lunar-Eclipse-Geeks

 

Sun at Greatest Eclipse

(Geocentric Coordinates)

R.A. =  16h19m43.5s

Dec. = -21°26'15.1"

S.D. =  00°16'12.9"

H.P. =  00°00'08.9"

 

Moon at Greatest Eclipse

(Geocentric Coordinates)

R.A. =  04h20m01.1s

Dec. = +20°27'44.8"

S.D. =  00°14'42.2"

H.P. =  00°53'57.7"

 

T 67 s | Rule = CdT (Danjon) | Eph. = VSOP87/ELP2000-85

The 28th November 2012 is classified as a Penumbral Lunar Eclipse, but there is another type which is very rare and known as a Total Penumbral Lunar Eclipse.

 

During most penumbral lunar eclipses, normally part of the Moon passes outside Earth's penumbral shadow. However, although it is rare, (actually extremely rare) sometimes the Moon passes completely immersed within the penumbra shadow - without any part of the Moon going outside the penumbra. These types of Lunar Eclipses are classified as a Total Penumbral Lunar Eclipse. Their rarity is indeed extremely rare. Over a period of five thousand years there is only 141 Total Penumbral Lunar Eclipses; this amounts to just 3.2% of penumbra lunar eclipses over a 5 millennium period. The remaining penumbral lunar eclipses [96.8%] are partial amounting to 4,237 over five millennium.  Please note that these percentages are for types of penumbral lunar eclipses; and not a normal partial lunar eclipse or total lunar eclipse.  

 

Eclipse of the Moon or the Penumbral Lunar Eclipse of 28 November 2012 belongs to Saros Series 145

 

The Penumbral Lunar Eclipse of 28 Novemner 2012 belongs to Saros Series 145 and is member number 11 out of 71 eclipses. All Lunar eclipses of Saros Series 145  occur at the Moon’s descending node and the Moon moves northward with each subsequent eclipse. Saros Series 145 first begun with a penumbral eclipse near the southern edge of Earth's Penumbra Shadow on Saturday11 August 1832; its last will also be a penumbral eclipse on Sunday16 September 3094.  The duration of Saros Series 45 is 1262.11 years.

Saros Series 145

All eclipses of saros series 145 occur at the Moons descending node.

First Eclipse; Saturday 11 August 1832, 14:14:52 TDLast Eclipse; Sunday 16 August 3094, 19:52:41 TD

Duration of Saros Series 145 - 1262.11 Years

TD = Terrestrial Dynamical Time

 

 

Saros 145 - with each subsequent eclipse of the series the Moon's orbital path is shifted northward with respect to Earth's shadow.

Each eclipse of the series is separated by 18 years 11 days 8 hours, or 6,585.3 days.

A Saros Cycle continues for several centuries.  

Duration of Saros Series 145 - 1262.11 Years

 

Saros Series Member 145 first began on Saturday 11 August 1832, with a very small penumbral eclipse occurring at the southern edge of the Earth's shadow, when the Moon was close to its descending node. Each successive Saros the Moon's orbital path is shifted northward with respect to Earth's shadow. It will have its final eclipse on Sunday 16 August 3094, as a very small penumbral eclipse with the southern rim of the Moon on the northern edge of Earth’s penumbra shadow.

 

 

 

 

The beginning and ending of penumbral eclipses are not visible to the eye.

The Moon has to be about 2/3 (two thirds) immersed in the penumbra to notice change of shade

 

The beginning and ending of penumbral eclipses are not visible to the eye and cannot be detected without scientific instruments.

 

Comparing the side-by-side images of the Moon, one can distinguish the subtle shading of the eclipsed Moon in the penumbra shadow of Earth, but noticing the difference while the celestial event is occurring can be much more challenging.

 

It is not until the Moon is approximately 2/3 covered by the shadow of the penumbra that any shading can be detected.

 

The Penumbral Lunar Eclipse of 28 November 2012 will become visible at; approximately 14:00 UT/GMT and continue until approximately 15:00 UT/GMT. It should  be remembered that these times for observing with the naked eye are approximate and other factors such as an observers own eye acuity can affect the time, as well as other factors such as local atmospheric conditions.

 

Moon magnitude of  0.9155

The Moon passes deep within the penumbral shadow of Earth, resulting in the Moon having magnitude 0.9155; this should help make the Moon’s ‘subtle change of shade’ more easy to see with the naked eye.

As can be seen by looking at the diagram, the Moon passes with its Northern Hemisphere deep in Earth's Penumbra shadow, therefore the Moon will appear darker on its Northern Hemisphere. The South Pole of the Moon passes just outside the penumbra, resulting in a brighter Southern Hemisphere of the Moon. This difference should be noticeable to observers of the eclipse.

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse, 28 November 2012

Quezon City, Philippines

Eclipsegeeks reproduced this image by kind permission of Raven Yu;

image credit, Raven Yu: http://journeytothestars.wordpress.com/

Approximately 35% of all Lunar Eclipses are of the Penumbral Type

 

About 35% of all lunar eclipses are of the penumbral type which are often difficult to see because the change of shade to the Moon is so small that hardly any difference can be seen to a normal Full Moon.

 

The reason for this is that the penumbra outer shadow of Earth cast out into Space in which the Moon orbits is about the same diameter as the Moon itself and therefore the Moon normally passes with part of its Northern Hemisphere or Southern Hemisphere outside the penumbra.

 

The proportion of the Moon outside the penumbra can be large, or it can be small, and this affects how easy or difficult it is to observe a penumbral lunar eclipse.

 

The Penumbral Lunar Eclipse of 28 November 2012

The Penumbral Lunar Eclipse of 28 November 2012 will see the Moon pass deeply within the penumbra and therefore it should provide an opportunity to see shading and dimming on the Moon’s surface.  

Diagram of a Penumbral Lunar Eclipse  

passing through Earth's fainter outer penumbra shadow

 

(click image to enlarge)

img-diagram-Penumbral-Lunar-Eclipse-Geeks Moon-postion-img-Diagram-November-2012-Penumbral-Lunar-Eclipse-Geeks

What is a Lunar Saros Cycle?

 

A Saros Series is a number of eclipses separated by approximately 18 years 11 days 8 hours, or 6,585.3 days, which share a very similar geometry, occur at the same node, occur with the Moon at nearly the same distance from Earth, and occur at the same time of year. They are therefore grouped into a single series.

 

A single series can consist of between 69 to 89 eclipses. Lunar Saros Series with odd numbers occur with the Moon in its descending node; and each successive Saros cycle, the Moon's orbital path is shifted northward with respect to the Earth's shadow.

 

Lunar Saros Series 145 [28 November 2012] is number 11 out of 71 eclipses.

 

Classification; Penumbral Lunar

 

 

It's First Eclipse was; Saturday 11 August 1832, 14:14:52 TD

 

It's final Eclipse is ; Sunday 16 August 3094, 19:52:41 TD

 

Duration of Saros Series 145 - 1262.11 Years

 

TD = Terrestrial Dynamical Time

 

Click on image to enlarge.

Diagram_of_Lunar_Eclipse_Saros_Cycle_Eclipse_Geeks

 

Eclipse of the Moon - Penumbral Lunar Eclipse - 28 November 2012

Regions from which the entire

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse is visible

 

Alaska, Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii, Arctic Ocean, Greenland (except for extreme southern tip): Continent of East Asia, Russia, China, Japan, Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia,

 

The Philippines, Nepal, Bhutan, and other countries on the continent of East Asia.

 

Parts of Canada -The Territory of Yukon [of Canada] | The extreme west of Northwest Territory [of Canada] | Extreme north-west British Columbia [Canada].

 

 

Regions from which the Lunar Penumbral Eclipse occurs at Moonset.

 

Central & Western Canada, Central & Western USA, and Mexico [except for south east Mexico]

Regions from which the Lunar Penumbral Eclipse occurs at Moonrise

 

East Europe, Eastern Africa, Middle East, Central Asia, Arabian Peninsula

 

Regions from which the Lunar Penumbral Eclipse is not visible

 

Eastern USA, Eastern Canada, western Africa, Antarctica, Portugal, western Spain, and Continent of Central and South America.

Click on World Map to enlarge.

 

World map of the penumbral lunar eclipse; shows regions of the world from which the lunar eclipse is visible. It also shows regions of the world from which the eclipse of the moon is not visible.

 

The eclipse is not visible from: Portugal, Western Spain, eastern Canada, west Africa, and continent of South Amercia.  

Diagram of Trajectory of the Moon through Earth’s penumbra weak diffuse shadow.

 

Penumbral Eclipse Contact - 28 November 2012

 

Penumbral Eclipse Contact Times: 28 November 2012

Saros Series 145 - Member number 11 of 71

 

TD = Terrestrial Dynamical Time

UT = Universal Time or GMT - Greenwich Meantime

 

Duration of Penumbral Lunar Eclipse: P1 to P4:

04hours 36minutes 05secs.

 

Ecliptic Conjunction; 14:45:56.1 UT  [14:47:02.9 TD]

 

P1) 12:14:58 UT/GMT

Greatest Eclipse; 14:33:00.0 UT/GMT [14:34:06.8 TD]

P4) 16:51:02 UT/GMT

 

Penumbral Magnitude; 0.9155 / P. Radius; 1.1811° / Gamma; -1.0868

 

Umbral Magnitude; -0.1872 / U. Radius; 0.6406° Axis; 0.9774°

 

 

 

The 28th November 2012 is classified as a Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

 

Although classified as a penumbral lunar eclipse, the Moon does not pass completely within the penumbra, instead (in this case 28 November 2012) the Moon passes with its south pole just outside the area of the penumbra.

Umbral Magnitude is the fraction of the Moon's diameter immersed in the umbra at maximum eclipse. For values greater than 1.0, the eclipse will be a total. For negative or minus values the eclipse is classified as a penumbral eclipse. The eclipse of 28 November 2012 is a penumbra lunar eclipse and has an Umbral Magnitude of  -0.1872.  

 

The November 2012 Lunar eclipse type

is a Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

 

A Solar eclipse always occurs two weeks before or after a lunar eclipse. As there was a Total Solar Eclipse on 13/14 November 2012, there is a Lunar Eclipse on 28 November 2012. The eclipse type is a Penumbral Lunar Eclipse with the Moon passing deep in Earth’s penumbra shadow. The Southern Hemisphere of the Moon will pass just outside Earth’s penumbra and therefore the Moon will appear a lighter shade on its southern region and darker on its Northern Hemisphere.

 

Observing the Penumbral Eclipse of the Moon

(or The Penumbral Lunar Eclipse.)

 

A Penumbral Lunar Eclipse is not as dramatic as a Total Lunar Eclipse and it will not turn red. Many Penumbral Lunar Eclipses are not very noticeable because the change of shade is very small and many go completely unnoticed. However the Penumbral Lunar Eclipse of 28 November 2012 passes almost completely (apart from the Moon’s extreme southern tip) within the penumbra and there should be opportunity to observe a gradually darkening on its surface.

 

The northern region of the Moon will appear a darker shade and gradually lighten in its southern region.

 

 

eclipse. Saros Series 145 first begun with a penumbral eclipse near the southern edge of Earth's Penumbra Shadow on Saturday11 August 1832; its last will also be a penumbral eclipse on Sunday 16th  September 3094.  The duration of Saros Series 45 is 1262.11 years.

 

The Penumbral Lunar Eclipse 28 November 2012 is the second lunar eclipse of 2012 and the fourth eclipse of the year.

 

The previous 3 eclipses of 2012 were; 1st eclipse;  Annular Solar Eclipse 20 May 2012

2nd eclipse; Partial Lunar Eclipse 04 June 2012

3rd eclipse; Total Solar Eclipse 13/14 November 2012.

 

The Penumbral Lunar Eclipse 28 November 2012 occurs at the Moons descending node.

Eclipse photos are available to be viewed.

 

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse Photos 2012

A similar penumbral lunar eclipse occurs on the 11th February 2017, information on the lunar eclipse can be viewed here:  

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse, February 2017 Photos Penumbral Lunar Eclipse, November 2012 photo-comparison-Philippines-2012-penumbral-lunar-