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Lunar Eclipse October 2013

Penumbral Eclipse of the Moon

Lunar Eclipse 18 19 October 2013

 

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse 18/19 October 2013;

Eclipse duration; 239 minutes

Penumbral magnitude. 0.791,

 

During 2013 there are 5 eclipses. Two eclipses of the Sun, and three eclipses of the Moon. This eclipse is the fourth eclipse of the year and is the third and final lunar eclipse of 2013.  

This penumbra eclipse of the Moon is the final lunar eclipse of 2013.

 

Penumbral Lunar Eclipses are subtle. Dimming of the Moon's surface is not always easily perceptible to casual observers

 

The eclipse will be visible over more than half of the Earth's surface, but it is not visible from New Zealand or Australia.  

 

The complete duration of the eclipse visible from;

Africa, Europe, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, Greenland, Iceland, Brazil, Extreme north east USA, East Canada, west Russia, extreme east Uruguay, east Paraguay, extreme east Bolivia, French Guiana, Suriname, Guyana, east Venezuela,  Madagascar, Middle East,

and parts of Asia.

 

The eclipse belongs to family of eclipses – Saros Series 117 and is number 52 out of 72 lunar eclipses.

 

18/19 October Penumbral Lunar Eclipse Contact Times

P1 - Penumbral Phase begins 21:51 UT/GMT 18 October 2013

P2 – Penumbral Phase ends 01:50 19 October 2013

 

However - a very important however;

The beginning and end of penumbral eclipses are not detectable to the eye.

To human vision, the actual observing time of a penumbral lunar eclipse is different to the actual physical contact times of the event.

 

The beginning and end of penumbral eclipses are not detectable to  the eye. Appreciable shading cannot be seen until approximately 2/3 of the Moon surface is immersed inside the penumbra. So the times given for the actual first physical contact and last physical contact with the penumbra, cannot be seen with the eye; it is not until approximately 23:30UT/GMT that any shading can be perceived, and will continue until approximately 00:10UT/GMT when  (although the penumbra eclipse is still occurring) will end as far as normal human vision is concerned.  

 

Approximate viewing times for normal human eye acuity.

Appreciable shading of the Moon’s surface to normal human eye acuity begins approximately;

23:30UT/GMT 18 October 2013

And ends at; 00:10UT/GMT 19 October 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saros Series 117 

Saros Series 117 lunar eclipses all occur with the Moon in descending node and in each subsequent eclipse, the Moon moves northward. Saros Series 117 began on 03 April 1094 iwith a penumbral eclipse near the southern edge of the penumbra. Saros Series 117 will end with a penumbral lunar eclipse near the northern edge of the penumbra on 15 May 2356. The total duration of Saros Series 117 is 1262.11 years.

 

The eclipse belongs to family of eclipses – Saros 117 and is number 52 out of 71 lunar eclipses.

First Eclipse occurred: 03 April 1094 at 17:48:02 TD

Last Eclipse:              15 May 2356  at 12:14:44 TD

Duration of Saros 117  =  1262.11 Years

 

World Map showing regions from which the Penumbral Lunar Eclipse can be observed. As previous stated, penumbra lunar eclipses are evtremely subtle, and the dimming of the Moon's surface is minimal, and often only perceptable to experienced lunar astronomers.

 

World Map showing regions from which the Penumbral Lunar Eclipse can be observed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Map credit F. Espenak NASA's GSFC

 

 

lunar eclipse at Moonrise: Penumbral Lunar Eclipse October 2013 is visible at Moonrise from; Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas), Argentina, Chile, Peru, most of Uruguay, central and west Paraguay, most of  Bolivia, Ecuador, Colombia, most of Venezuela, (Central American countries of; Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala) (Caribbean Islands of; Puerto Rica, Dominican Republic) Mexico, most of United States of America (including north-west Alaska), and most of Canada.

 

lunar eclipse at Moonset: Penumbral Lunar Eclipse October 2013 is visible at moonset from; eastern Asia, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Bhutan, [Myanmar (Burma)] Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, north-west North Korea,  China, Nepal, Mongolia, and east Russian Federation.  

 

The entire eclipse is visible from;

Africa, Europe, Falkland Islands, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, Greenland, Iceland, Brazil, Extreme north east USA, East Canada, west Russia, extreme east Uruguay, east Paraguay, extreme east Bolivia, French Guiana, Suriname, Guyana, east Venezuela,  Madagascar, Middle East,

and parts of Asia.

 

The beginning and end of penumbral eclipses are not detectable to  the eye.

The beginning and end of penumbral eclipses are not detectable to  the eye. Appreciable shading cannot be seen until approximately 2/3 of the Moon surface is immersed inside the penumbra. So the times given for the actual first physical contact and last physical contact with the penumbra, cannot be seen with the eye; it is not until approximately 23:30UT/GMT that any shading can be perceived, and will continue until approximately 00:10UT/GMT when  (although the penumbra eclipse is still occurring) will end as far as normal human vision is concerned.  

 

For those that would like to record the October lunar Eclipse event.

Local atmospheric conditions and the observer's own visual acuity are important factors to consider when viewing the penumbra lunar eclipse. For some of you, it may be an interesting exercise to note when penumbral shading is first and last seen. It is always useful to record the time in UT/GMT as well as that of your own time zone.  

 

Various astronomy associations and astronomy clubs may be interested in receiving your data of the penumbra lunar eclipse of October 2013. Details can often be found in local newspapers, local magazines, Yellow Pages, Thompson Local Directories, and by checking on the internet for local clubs and National Astronomy Associations.

 

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse Diagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Penumbral Lunar Eclipse.

What is a Penumbral Lunar Eclipse?

 

Physical Aspects and Geometry of a Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

 

During a penumbral lunar eclipse the Moon passes through the penumbra shadow of Earth but (in most cases) the Moon is not completely immersed in the penumbra, instead either the northern hemisphere or southern hemisphere of the Moon passes outside the penumbral shadow. Penumbral Lunar Eclipses are subtle, and shading (darkening) of the Moon is faint.

 

During the October 2013 eclipse, the Moon passes through the penumbra with its Southern Hemisphere immersed in the penumbra and its Northern Hemisphere passing just outside the penumbra shadow of Earth. The Moon will have brighter shading on its Northern Hemisphere, with a progressive gradual and fainter shading towards its Southern Hemisphere.

 

 

 

 

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By checking the eclipse diagram you can see that the Moon passes through the penumbra shadow of Earth, but it is not completely immersed in the penumbra, instead the northern hemisphere of the Moon passes outside the penumbral shadow, and in physical terminology, the eclipse is only a partial penumbral lunar eclipse.

 

The penumbra shadow cast by the Earth into Space varies according to the specific eclipse, but the penumbra is always about the same size as the Moon’s diameter, and it is rare for the Moon to pass completely inside the penumbra. It nearly always passes with either its northern or southern hemisphere outside the penumbra.

 

Lunar eclipses which pass through any part of the deep umbra (reddish region) are of course a partial lunar eclipse; and those that pass completely within the umbra are Total Lunar Eclipses.  

 

In the rare cases when a Penumbral Eclipse of the Moon passes completely within the penumbra; it is known as a Total Penumbra Lunar Eclipse. But these are extremely rare as the penumbra shadow cast out into Space is about the same size as the Moon, and they rarely align.

 

During this lunar eclipse the Moon passes through the penumbra area, with the extreme northern hemisphere passing outside any type of shadow. The eclipse is probably mainly of interest to keen lunar astronomers, and those taking measurements, because the lunar surface will only show subtle changes in shade and dimness.

 

During this penumbral lunar eclipse, the northern hemisphere of the Moon will appear brighter, with a gradual decrease in shade towards the southern hemisphere.

image-medium-diagram-of-penumbral-Lunar-Eclipse-Geeks 2013_world_map_October_Lunar_Eclipse_Geeks