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Geminids Meteor Shower - The Geminids  2014

 

The Geminids radiate from near the constellation of Gemini - The Twins.

 

Geminids are currently the most active of the regular annual showers

 

Geminids are (in meteor terms) slow moving and long lasting meteors.

 

Geminids Meteor Shower active from 08th December to 17th December 2014

 

Peak activity 14 December 2014 - 07:00hours  

 

Velocity of Geminid Meteors

 

The Geminid Meteors enter Earth's atmosphere relatively slow at

35 km/sec / 126,000km/h / 78,292mph.

Diagram of the Geminids Meteor Shower radiating from the constellation of Gemini - The Twins

 

Northern Hemisphere perspective

51.2667° N, 1.0876° W

 

Viewing the Geminids Meteor Shower

 

Northern Hemisphere

 

Viewing the Geminids:

The Geminids radiate from the constellation of Gemini, but you do not have to look directly at Gemini to see any meteors.  They can appear anywhere, but if you trace them back, they will most likely have originated close to Gemini – The Twins. They often appear in the east southern or southern sky, and if you look long enough you will be rewarded with bright meteors streak across the sky.

 

Velocity of the Geminids: the Geminids enter Earth's atmosphere relatively slow at approximately 35 km/sec / 126,000km/h / 78,292mph.

 

Geminids Meteor Shower Peak Activity: 14 December.

Please note:

This is not the night of the 14, it is the time between the 13 December night through midnight to early Sunday morning of the 14 December.

 

Geminids Meteor Shower Active from:    08 December to 17 December.

 

 

Viewing Conditions: Meteors per hour - (Zenithal hourly rate - ZHR) 100

 

Viewing the Geminids Meteor Shower

 

Southern Hemisphere

 

Viewing the Geminids:

Viewing conditions from the Southern Hemisphere are less favourable.

 

Depending on one’s latitude (for example as viewed from New Zealand) the radiant is low, lying just a degree or two to the left off, and slightly below, Castor. (Castor is one of the stars in the Constellation of Gemini) and so about 50% of all meteors are wiped from view because activity is occurring below the horizon.

   

The more north from New Zealand, the more you can observe and more meteors streaking across the sky can be seen.

 

Expect to see less half 'Meteors Per Hour' from New Zealand, compared to  than Northern Hemisphere observers.

 

 

 

 

 

Viewing Conditions: Meteors per hour - (Zenithal hourly rate - ZHR) 50 or less.

 

Geminids Viewing Conditions 2014

Some interference from the Moon

 

Viewing Conditions are not ideal due to the Moon rising just after midnight. However, although the Moon is a Waning Gibbous at 56.9% illuminated, if you can position yourself away from its view, many meteors should be observable.

 

Official classification: Quite favourable.

 

 

Geminids are hard

 

Meteor Showers are caused by debris from a comet or an asteroid that has left a trail of dust, ice, or fragments of rock in space.  When the Earth passes through this trail of dust, we have one of the many annular meteor showers that occur during the year. Most annular meteor showers burn up fast when entering Earth’s atmosphere because they originate from comets and the fragments are soft in composition.

 

However the Geminid Meteor Shower is caused by fragments which are hard and gritty.

 

Geminids physical Characteristics

 

The Geminids are different to other major annual meteor showers (with the exception of the Quadrantids) because they originate from the dust and particles of an asteroid (3200 Phaethon) while all the other major meteor showers originate from the dust and particles from comets.  

 

The Geminid meteors are rocky and gritty, and are often slightly easier to see than other showers. The Geminids are commonly bright with long persisting trains, and they are typically one of the best and most reliable of the annual meteor showers, and because the ‘meteor shower’ usually start earlier than other showers, and for those in the Northern Hemisphere, with long nights, getting dark early, the Geminid Meteor showers is an ideal opportunity for younger viewers to see their first ‘shooting star.’

Geminids are ideal for younger viewers

 

The Geminids are ideal for the younger viewers. The Geminid Meteor Shower is typically one of the best and most reliable of the annual meteor showers.

 

The Geminids are commonly bright with long persisting trains, and because they usually start earlier than other showers, for those in the Northern Hemisphere, with night starting early and lasting long, the Geminid Meteor shower is an ideal opportunity for younger viewers to see their first ‘shooting star.’

Geminids-Meteor-Shower-2014-medium-diagram-Eclipse-Geeks

Click Geminds diagram to view enlarged image.