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General Details, Lunar and Solar Eclipses 2012: Plus Rare Transit of Venus, June 2012

 

 There are four eclipses during 2012 - Two Solar Eclipses and Two Lunar Eclipses 

The two Solar Eclipses 2012; are both central eclipses - an Annular Solar eclipse and a Total Solar Eclipse.

The two Lunar Eclipses 2012; one is a Partial Lunar Eclipse and the other is a Penumbra Lunar Eclipse.

Lunar, Solar, Eclipse Guide 2012; Transit of Venus 2012

 

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Moon-digram-image-4-June-2012-Partial-Lunar-Eclips

 

 

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1st eclipse;  Annular Solar Eclipse 20 May 2012

visible from the North Pole, east Asia, the north

Pacific Ocean, and western North America.

Maximum Eclipse; just east of Albuquerque, New Mexico - duration 5m 46s

Transit of Venus across the surface of the Sun; 05/06 June 2012

 

2012 Entire Venus Transit visible from; central and eastern Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii, Alaska, north west Canada, mid to eastern Asia, the western Pacific,  Papua New Guinea, North Korea, South Korea, Japan, Phillines, and south eastern China..

 

2012 Part Transit of Venus visible: The Sun sets while the transit is still in progress from most of North America, the northwest of South America and the Caribbean. The transit is already in progress at sunrise from west to central Asia, the Middle East, Europe, United Kingdom, and eastern Africa.

 

2012, No visibility Transit Venus: No part of the transit of Venus can be seen from Portugal or southern Spain, west Africa, and the south east 2/3 of South America. 

2nd eclipse: Partial Lunar Eclipse 04 June 2012

visible f rom east Asia, Australia, the west and central Americas, and the Pacific Ocean.

Maximum Eclipse 37% of the Moon's surface is obscured.

3rd eclipse; Total Solar Eclipse 13/14 November 2012

visible from north east Australia and a narrow track of

totality across the South Pacific Ocean. A partial solar eclipse

is visible from most regions of Australia, New Zealand and the

South Pacific Ocean. Maximum eclipse; South Pacific Ocean - duration 4m 2s

4th eclipse; Penumbral Lunar Eclipse 28 November 2012

visible from Europe, East Africa, Asia, Australia, the Pacific Ocean, and most of North America.

Penumbral Magnitude; 0.9155 which means that the Moon does not completely enter the Earth's penumbra.  

 

transit-of-Venus-Sun-small-mage-eclipse-geeks

 

 

 

 

Global Eclipses 2012 - Brief General outline of Solar and Lunar Eclipses 2012 - times are in UT/GMT - Universal Time / Greenwich Meantime

 1st eclipse;  Annular Solar Eclipse 20 May 2012

North Pole, east Asia, north Pacific Ocean, western North America

 

Solar Eclipse Circumstances Predicted Time (UT)                                    

                                                           h   m   s            

P1: First Contact:;         Partial eclipse begins;   20:56:07.0

U1: Second Contact:  Annular eclipse begins;   22:06:16.9    

U2: First internal tangency of umbral shadow

      to the circular outer edge of Earth;                 22:11:46.7

Greatest Maximum Eclipse:                              23:52:46.6    

U3: Last internal tangency of umbral shadow

      to the circular outer edge of Earth;                 01:33:42.6    

U4: Third Contact:        Annular eclipse ends;    01:39 0.9    

P4: Fourth Contact:     Partial Eclipse ends;       02:49:21.5    

 

Gamma: 0.4828

Eclipse Magnitude: 0.9439

 

Annular Solar Eclipse Maximum Path Width; 236.9km / 147.2 miles

Maximum Eclipse Duration; 05m 46.3s

 

Maximum Greatest Eclipse; North Pacific Ocean

Latitude 49°05.7'N | Longitude 176°16.5'E

 

(index for below: TD =Terrestrial Dynamic Time)

 

Solar Saros Seires 128 Member 58 of 73

          First Eclipse: 29 August       0984  -  08hrs 35m 40s TD

          Last Eclipse:  01 November 2282  -  05hrs 06m 24s TD

 

Duration of Saros Seires 128  -  1298.17 years

 

2nd eclipse; Partial Lunar Eclipse 04 June 2012

Australia, east Asia, west and central Americas, and the Pacific Ocean

 

Lunar Eclipse Circumstances Predicted Eclipse Contacts (UT)

                              h  m   s

P1 – Moon Enters Earth's Penumbra:       08:48:09

U1 – Moon Enters Earth's Umbra:             09:59:53

Maximum Eclipse                                   11:03:13

U4 – Moon Leaves Earth's Umbra:           12:06:30

P4 – Moon Leaves Earth's Penumbra:     13:18:17

 

Penumbra Radius: 1.2926°

Umbra Radius - 0.7671°

 

 

Gamma; 0.8247

Penumbra Magnitude: 1.3184 / Umbra Magnitude: 0.3705  

 

Maximum Eclipse Obscuration - Moon 0%

Penumbra Eclipse Duration: 04h 35m 59s

                         Umbra Eclipse Duration:       0h    0m   0s

 

 

 

(TD = Terrestial Dymanic Time)

 

Lunar Saros Seires 140 - Member 25 of 80

First Eclipse - 25 September 1597  -  13:40:53 TD

Last Eclipse -  06 January 2968  -   21:40:03 TD

 

Duration of Saros 140  -  1370.29 years

 

 

 

 

3rd eclipse; Total Solar Eclipse 13 November 2012

Local Time Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific - 14 Nov

 

Total Solar Eclipse; north east Australia, South Pacific Ocean

Partiial Solar Eclipse; Australia, Papua New Guinea,New Zealand

 

Solar Eclipse Circumstances Predicted Time (UT/GMT)

                                      h   m   s            

P1: First Contact:        19:37:58.1  

P2: Second Contact:   21:43:42.5    

P3: Third Contact:       22:39:44.4    

P4: Fourth Contact:    00:45:34.1    

 

Gamma: 0.3718

Eclipse Magnitude: 1.0500

 

Total Solar Eclipse Maximum Path Width; 178.9km / 111.163 miles

Maximum Eclipse Duration; 04m 02.2s

 

Maximum Greatest Eclipse; South Pacific Ocean

Latitude 39°56.9'S | Longitude 161°19.8W

 

(index for below: TD =Terrestrial Dynamic Time)

 

Solar Saros Seires 133 Member 45 of 72

          First Eclipse: 13 July 1219  -  08hrs 23m 41s TD

          Last Eclipse:  05 September 2499  -  22hrs 05m 19s TD

 

Durration of Saros Seires 133  -  1298.17 years

 

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4th eclipse; Penumbral Lunar Eclipse 28 November 2012

Europe, east Africa, Asia, Australia, Paciific Ocean

 

Lunar Eclipse Circumstances Predicted Eclipse Contacts (UT)

 

                               h  m   s

P1 – Moon Enters Earth's Penumbra:       12:14:58

Maximum Eclipse:                                      14:33:00

P4 – Moon Leaves Earth's Penumbra:      16:51:02

 

Penumbra Radius: 1.1811°

Umbra Radius - 0.6406°

 

Maximum Eclipse Obscuration - Moon 0%

Penumbra Eclipse Duration: 04h 36m 05s

Umbra Eclipse Duration:       00h 00m 00s

 

Gamma; 1.0868

Penumbra Magnitude: 0.9155 / Umbra Magnitude: 0.1873

 

 

 

 

 

 

(TD = Terrestial Dymanic Time)

 

Lunar Saros Seires 145 - Member 11 of 72

                   First Eclipse;  11 July       1843   -   16:49:54  TD

                   Last Eclipse;  29 August   3123   -   06:55:44 TD

 

Duration of Saros 140  -  1280.14 years

                                               Transit of Venus 2012 - 05/06 June 2012

 

Transit’s of Venus across the disk of the Sun are amongst the rarest of planetary alignments. They are so rare that since the invention of the telescope by Galileo Galilei in 1609, only seven transits have occurred, and one only has to go back 4 Venus transits to when Captian Cook and his men observed a Venus Transit in 1769 from the Pacifiic Island of Tahita. Previous transits of Venus occurred during; 1631, 1639, 1761, 1769, 1874, 1882 and 2004.

 

Complete Transit of Venus is visible

The complete Transit of Venus can be viewed from; Eastern Australia, New Zealand, Alaska, Hawaii, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, South Korea, North Korea, Japan, north west British Columbia, extreme north west Canada, eastern Russian Federation, south east China, and eastern Asia region.    

 

No visibility: No part of the transit of Venus can be seen from Portugal, southern Spain, west Africa, and the south east 2/3 of South America.

 

Planet-Venus-image-natural-colour-color-Eclipse-Geeks,

Venus in Natural Visible Light

image credit: Pioneer Venus Orbiter Team NASA

 

1st contact: The instance Venus touches the outer rim of the Sun;  

                        beginning of transit. (Ingress, exterior contact)    

 

2nd contact: The instance the whole of Venus is entirely inside the inner  

                         rim of the Sun at beginning of transit. (Ingress, Interior

                         contact)

 

Maximum or Greatest Transit; is the moment when Venus passes closest to the centre of the Sun (this moment is also called, minimum separation) The two terms, Maximum Transit and Minimum Separation are used collectively toget, the former is Venus's postion, the latter is a measurment of Venus to the centre of the Sun.

 

Maximum Transit is Venus's nearest position to the Sun's centre.

 

Minimum Separation is the actual measured angle of distance to the centre of the Sun.

 

3rd Contact: The instance when Venus touches the opposite inside rim of the Sun at the end of the transit. (egress, interior contact.

 

4th contact: The instance when Venus is leaving its transit and last  touches the outer rim of the Sun - transit ends.                         (egress, exterior  contact)..

Venus Contact Description

The Transit of Venus 05/06 June 2012

Transit of Venus

times of contact are in Universal Time -  UT

1st contact:  05 June 2012;       22h 09m 40.6s

2nd contact; 05 June 2012;       22h 27m 28.7s

Maximum:    06 June, 2012;      01h 29m 35.9s

3rd contact:  06 June 2012;       04h 31m 42.8s

4th contact:  06 June 2012;       04h 49m 30.9s  

 

Venus Transit Geocentric Data

General Duration of Venus Transit;  06h 39m 48s

Central  Duration of Venus Transit;  06h 04m 12s

Minimum Separation; 554.4°

 

 

Upside Down World and the Transit of Venus

From  Southern Hemisphere

New Zealand / Australia

Important  Note - Venus Transit Times:

 

The ‘times’ of Venus's transit have been calculated to the first decimal point of a second and for an observer at Earth's centre - viewing from locations around the world where Venus is seen overhead.

 

However due to paralllax and those viewing the transit of Venus close to sunset or sunrise  times may differ by several minutes due to parallax and atmospheric refraction.

 

Effects of Parallax: Venus's 58 arc-second diameter disc can be shifted by up to 30 arc-seconds from its geocentric coordinates depending on the observer's exact position on Earth. This can affect 'the time' at which any stage of the transit of Venus is seen due to the observers viewing angle.

 

Example of Parallax: can be seen when driving a car or being carried as a passenger. If the dashboard uses a needle-style speedometer gauge, when viewed from directly in front of the driver, the speed may show 60, but when viewed from the passenger's seat, the speed usually looks different due to the angle of viewing.  

 

Atmospheric Refraction: Is caused by the bending of light by Earth's atmosphere. When viewing celestial bodies close to the horizon, they can be displaced, appearing higher in the sky to their true geometric position.

 

Transit Times may therefore differ by up to seven minutes depending on one's location or if veiwing the Venus Transit at sunset or sunrise.

Times of Eclipse Contact and Transit of Venus are in Greenwich Meantime/GMT - Universal Time/UT. | UT is used for astronomical calculations and predictions of celestial and astronomical events. To find your local time zone difference to UT you may want to use

 

The Transt of Venus viewed from the Southern Hemisphere from locations of latitude such as Australia and New Zealand will see Venus Transit across the lower limb of the Sun. Venus will also traverse the Sun from right to left - opposite to the Northern Hemisphere.

Diagram_Venus_Transit_Times_Venus_05_06_June_2012_Eclipse_Geeks,

 Venus Transit 2004

Eclipse is finished and photos are available to be viewed.

 

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse Photos 2012

 

Venus-Transit-Australia-Southern-Hemisphere-June-2012-diagram-image-Eclipse-Geeks